Nottinghamshire Police

Assistant Chief Constable Ian Ackerley, Nottinghamshire Police

Assistant Chief Constable Ian Ackerley (retired)
Gold Commander” overseeing Operation Aeroscope, and responsible for both setting policy and authorising Mark Kennedy’s deployment into those planning the protest at Ratcliff-on-Soar power station.

Ackerley was ACC (Support) for Nottinghamshire police at the time of Operation Aeroscope, and regularly led that force’s response to public order situations. He joined Staffordshire Police in 1978 working in both uniform and CID policing.[1]Police Chief, Derby Evening Telegraph, 1 September 2006 (accessed via Nexis).[2]New man joins police, Nottingham Evening Post, 27 June 2006 (accessed via Nexis). From 1998, he played a leading role in policing football, both investigating football hooliganism and as a match commander. In this later role, he oversaw policing of high-tension football matches in 2000 and 2002, including the violent clashes between Staffordshire based Stoke and Cardiff City. At the time, Stoke was one of the top three clubs for hooliganism. As such, Ackerley would have worked with football intelligence units (including at the National Criminal Intelligence Service) and on public order issues.[3]Phil Jones, High security operation for Man City fixture, The Sentinel (Stoke), 26 January 1999 (accessed via Nexis).[4]Sarah Chapman, Massive security for crunch game, The Sentinel (Stoke), 26 April 2000 (accessed via Nexis).[5]Kathie McInnes, 2,500 limit on away fans at play-off semi, The Sentinel (Stoke), 23 April 2002 (accessed via Nexis).[6]Alistair Keely, Six arrested as police wage war on football violence, Birmingham Post, 7 August 1998 (accessed via Nexis).

In this time he is appointed Superintendent as head of crime reduction (crime prevention unit) for the enhanced Stoke-on-Trent division (1999). From June/July 2000, he becomes a Chief Superintendent as Commander of the North Staffordshire Division.[7]Division Revamp brings promotion for policeman, The Sentinel (Stoke), 23 November 1998 (accessed via Nexis).[8]Police name new men to spearhead crime fight, The Sentinel (Stoke), 12 March 1999 (accessed via Nexis).[9]Phil Jones, Traffic police fears over redeployment, The Sentinel (Stoke), 7 June 2000 (accessed via Nexis).[10]Rosalind Chimes, Fast track to police for victims of crime, The Sentinel (Stoke), 26 July 2000 (accessed via Nexis). He took over from Alan Wright who retired in June 2000. By August 2005 he was the Temporary Assistant Chief Constable for Staffordshire,[11]Jim Guthrie, Police fire on Gunman in hospital, Birmingham Evening Mail, 19 August 2005 (accessed via Nexis). where one of his schemes including sending in undercover police to target landlords who had not applied for new-style alcohol licenses.[12]James Cartledge, Undercover cops in booze mission, Birmingham Evening Mail, 4 November 2005 (accessed via Nexis).[13]Much of the focus of Ackerley’s career as a senior officer at Staffordshire police focused around drink-related crime, including binge-drinking, domestic violence and football violence, as well as domestic burglaries. Author: search of local newspaper articles, conducted August 2016.

In September 2006, he moved to Nottinghamshire Police as Assistant Chief Constable (Operational Support), succeeding Peter Ditchett.[14]New man joins police, Nottingham Evening Post, 27 June 2006 (accessed via Nexis).[15]Move for top-ranking policeman, The Sentinel (Stoke), 4 August 2006 (accessed via Nexis).[16]Senior officer to step down, Nottingham Evening Post, 14 December 2011 (accessed via Nexis). In 2007, he becomes ACC (Territorial), having taken over territorial policing from Susannah Fish. At Nottingham he continues to oversee public order issues.[17]Guy Woodford, Government inspectors probe Notts policing pledge, Nottingham Evening Post, 18 January 2010 (accessed via Nexis).[18]Guy Woodford, Force advertises for new chief officer team, Nottingham Evening Post, 20 March 2010 (accessed via Nexis). These included the protests at Ratcliffe on Soar power station (including Operation Aeroscope and Operation Median, the latter dealing with the ‘Great Climate Swoop’ protest of October 2009), an English Defence League march and counter-protests, labour disputes at Staythorpe power station (Op. Aestival) and football matches.[19]Marcus Boocock, Police spend £1.15m on major operations, Nottingham Evening Post, 19 July 2010 (accessed via Nexis). He was forced to retire at the end of 2011 as the force had brought in a mandatory 30 years service policy, something he and others brought an unsuccessful legal challenge on.[20]Senior officer to step down, Nottingham Evening Post, 14 December 2011 (accessed via Nexis).[21]Forcing Notts Police officers to retire was ‘lawful’, Eastwood Advertiser, 8 July 2015 (accessed via Nexis).

Ch. Supt. John Busuttil
“Silver commander” for Operation Aeroscope.[22]Response of Nottinghamshire Police to FOIA request made by Merrick Badger, 24 July 2018. He and Ackerley who are the only senior officers at the first ‘Gold’ meeting of 25 March from which Aeroscope is initiated as a formal operation. He also attends the second one, of 7 April. Busuttil was closely involved in the operations, and is mentioned in NPIOU intelligence reports as “Silver Commander Notts” as receiving briefing from them – Mark Kennedy’s controller, DI David Hutcheson of the NPOIU briefed him directly on 12 April, the day before the arrests. At other points, intelligence from the NPOIU / Mark Kennedy being given to the Head of Nottinghamshire Special Branch to pass on to him.[23]Intelligence reports relating to 2009 planned protest at Ratcliffe-on-Soar power station, National Public Order Intelligence Unit, 2009. Accessed via SpecialBranchFiles.uk. As Silver Commander he had tactical responsibility for Aeroscope, and as such he who would have actively overseen the operation leading up to the arrests.

At the time Busuttil, was Commander of the South Notts (D) Division, with the Ratcliffe-on-Soar power station within his territorial brief. Under him served a number of officers involved in Aeroscope around the time of the arrests: Supt. Paul Anderson, Supt. Mike Manley, DCI Rob Severn and Ch. Insp. Ian Barrowcliffe.

Busuttil would face further protests at Ratcliffe-on-Soar during the October 2009 ‘Great Climate Swoop’ demonstration.[24]Robert Booth & Bibi van der Zee, Environment: Protesters arrested after clashes at Ratcliffe power plant , The Guardian, 18 October 2009.[25]Climate change protestors bitten by police dogs, The Telegraph (Reuters), 18 October 2009.

Busuttil career appears to have been in uniform rather than CID. Much of his service was spent in the operational support unit based in Nottingham, which included a period as the firearms commander.[26]Ballet with Princess Di? It was all in a day’s work, Nottingham Evening Post, 30 October 2010 (accessed via Nexis). From 2002-2004 he was Chief Inspector, Head of Traffic, before becoming Superintendent, Head of Operations at Worksop (B Division) 2005-2006. after which he transferred to the same position at D Division, in time to be around for when the successful environmental protest, ‘Spring Into Action’ took place at the power station.[27]Alan ‘Tash’ Lodge, Nottingham Spring into Action :: Ratcliffe-on-Soar Power Station 1, Indymedia, 11 April 2007. He had been promoted to
head of D Division in 2008, and retired in late 2010 after 30 years of service.[28]Police and Constabulary Almanac, various years, R Hazell & Co, various years.[29]Top cop with royal past retires, Nottingham Evening Post (ThisIsNottingham.com), 30 October 2010 (accessed 16 July 2017).[30]Police officer recalls Kegworth crash, Nottingham Evening Post, 3 January 2009 (accessed via Nexis).[31]Ballet with Princess Di? It was all in a day’s work, Nottingham Evening Post, 30 October 2010 (accessed via Nexis).

Det. Ch. Supt. Ian Waterfield, Nottinghamshire Police

Detective Chief Superintendent Ian Waterfield
Director of Intelligence for Nottinghamshire Police, having oversight of its Special Branch. Attended the second Gold meeting of 7 April, where the role of an undercover among the environmentalists is discussed.

According to his LinkedIn profile, as Director of Intelligence, he ‘had responsibility and oversight of all RIPA authorisations, CHIS and covert policing operations.'[32]Ian Waterfield, Profile, LinkedIn.com, 2017 (accessed 16 July 2017). As such he would have had oversight of Kennedy’s deployment in Nottingham. His role as Director of Crime and Intelligence from December 2009 further meant he was the immediate superior to Det. Supt. Adrian Pearson and had oversight of the Operation Aeroscope investigation.

A career officer with Nottinghamshire Police, he held a number of uniformed and detective posts. From 2003 he was Superintendent of Operations for Mansfield Division. In February 2006, he is appointed Director of Intelligence for the force in February 2006 and remains in this post until July 2014. In December 2009 he absorbs Neil James’ post (see below) to become Head of Crime as well. In 2012 his role is further expanded as head of Crime and Justice (with a new Director of Intelligence under him). He is Temporary Assistant Chief Constable covering crime, justice and specialist operation from October 2012 to June 2013. In September 2016 he became Director of Operations for the Gangmaster Licensing Authority.[33]Notts Police get new Head of Crime, Nottingham Evening Post, 15 December 2009 (accessed 16 July 2017).[34]Ian Waterfield, Profile, LinkedIn.com, 2017 (accessed 16 July 2017).

Det. Ch. Supt. Neil James, Nottinghamshire Police

Detective Chief Superintendent Neil James
Appears to have played a small role in Operation Aeroscope in the post-arrest phase (and not prior), where he called for meetings once it became apparent an undercover had been involved. Given career with Nottinghamshire Police Is likely to have been aware of NPOIU operations in the city.

Previously a Detective Superintendent with West Midlands Police where he investigated major crime. In December 2005 he joined Nottinghamshire Police as Detective Chief Superintendent, briefly as Director of Intelligence, and then from February 2006 to September 2010 as Head of Crime (CID). In 2009 he begins part time work teaching on major crime investigations, with the National Policing Improvements Agency, formally joining them in 2010.[35]Cash priorities in the war on crime, Nottingham Evening Post, 23 February 2007 (accessed via Nexis).[36]Neil James, Profile, LinkedIn.com, undated (accessed 1 September 2016).[37]No CID vacancy crisis in Notts, says crime chief, Nottingham Evening Post, 12 September 2009 (accessed 25 August 2016).[38]Shared intelligence helps snare gunman, Forced Times (Notts NARPO News), Issue 1, May 2008 (accessed 20 August 2016).[39]Notts Police get new Head of Crime, Nottingham Evening Post, 15 December 2009 (accessed 16 July 2017).

Det. Supt. Adrian Pearson, SIO for Aeroscope.

Detective Superintendent Adrian Pearson
Senior Investigation Officer for Aeroscope once the arrests taken place, but had not been involved prior, having only just joined Nottinghamshire.

Previously served at Warwickshire police, where he led investigations into serious and violent crime, and served as Crime Manager, based at Leamington for several years. He had only just joined Nottinghamshire Police as a Detective Superintendent heading up the Public Protection Unit when he was appointed Senior Investigation Officer for Operation Aeroscope. He continued as Head of Public Protection Unit (which included Child Protection) for several years and led several high profile investigations, including historical child sex abuse Operation Equinox.[40]Police and Constabulary Almanac, various years, R Hazell & Co, various years.[41]Author: search of contemporary news reports, conducted July 2016.[42]James Barlow, Key police officer investigating child sexual abuse in Notts ‘no longer part of inquiry’, NottsTV.com, 19 November 2016 (accessed 16 July 2017).

Detective Chief Inspector Rob Severn
Senior Investigating Officer (“Bronze”) for Aeroscope in the pre-arrest phase, though did not attend the Gold Level meetings. He was replaced as SIO for Aeroscope by Pearson on 13 April. At the start of 2009 he is listed as Acting Det. Ch. Insp., as Head of Crime Investigation for South Notts “D” Division, the police area which covered Ratcliffe-on-Soar.[43]Police and Constabulary Almanac, 2009, R Hazell & Co.

An officer with Nottinghamshire CID since the early 2000s, he appears in local media at various points as a senior investigating office for sexual and violent crimes and robberies. He first came to notice as a Detective Sergeant with the City Division Robbery Squad in 2005. In 2011, he was a Detective Inspector with the force’s Public Protection Unit (under Pearson). Later, appointed to full DCI rank, he became Nottinghamshire Police’s lead on burglary by 2015 and in 2017 continued to be involved leading serious crime investigations.[44]Mugger hunt stepped up, Nottingham Evening Post, 15 April 2005 (accessed via Nexis).[45]Rebecca Sherdley, Man jailed for sex assaults on elderly, Nottingham Evening Post, 21 December 2011 (accessed via Nexis).[46]Ellie Cullen, Burglaries cut by half in Nottinghamshire, Nottingham Evening Post, 15 February 2015 (accessed 25 August 2016).[47]Issac Ashe, Teenager jailed for manslaughter over stabbing of 21-year-old Aqib Mazhar, Nottingham Evening Post, 9 May 2017 (accessed 16 July 2017).

Detective Inspector Andy Bateman
Head of Nottinghamshire Special Branch at the time of Aeroscope, he is briefed by the NPIOU and is an conduit of intelligence from Mark Kennedy to the operation’s commanding officers.

A Nottinghamshire CID officer based at St. Anns, Radford, Sneinton and Beeston stations, investigating serious crime, he first comes to public attention as a Detective Sergeant in 2002.[48]Steve McComish, Phone Girl is Caged, Daily Mirror, 1 March 2002 (accessed via Nexis). He is appointed Detective Inspector, Head of Special Branch in 2008 and remains there until early 2011 when he returns to investigating serious and violent crime – appearing as such, still with rank of Detective Inspector, in June 2016.[49]Tom Norton, Police hit streets to investigate death outside Nottinghamshire hospital, Nottingham Evening Post, 7 June 2016 (accessed 10 August 2016).

Detective Inspector Andrew Roberts
Deputy Senior Investigation Officer for Aeroscope in the post-arrest phase, having been selected to the post by Pearson. Second in command of the operation, he would have responsibility for its day-to-day running.

Prior to Aeroscope, in 2008 / 2009 Roberts was a CID officer based in Nottingham where he was involved in murder investigations. Following Aeroscope, he appears in various investigations conducted by Nottinghamshire Police’s Major Crime Unit over the next couple of years.[50]Man jailed over racists attacks, Press Association, 18 July 2008 (accessed via Nexis).[51]Police warning over wallplanner scam, Press Association, 14 February 2008 (accessed via Nexis).[52]Man found guilty over stab death, BBC News Online, 16 January 2009 (accessed 16 July 2017).[53]Author: search of local media, conducted July 2017.

Det Supt. Stephen Lowe
Attends significant meeting in post arrest phase of Aeroscope, to discuss implications of there being an undercover officer among the arrested. As former head of the force’s Special Branch, he is likely to have had a strong working knowledge of the NPOIU and its operations among environmentalists in the city.

Lowe was head of Nottinghamshire Special Branch from 1998 to 2004 (as Detective Inspector), during which time he would have overseen the infiltration of NPOIU officers Rod Richardson and Mark Kennedy. In 2004, he is promoted to Detective Chief Inspector when moves on to serious crime investigations.[54]Gloves linked killing to shooter, BBC News Online, 18 July 2005 (accessed 30 August 2016). By 2008 he had become Det. Supt., Head of the Serious and Organised Crime Unit, serving under DCS Neil James.[55]Team that smashed Hardy drugs empire, Nottingham Evening Post, 20 May 2009 (accessed 30 August 2016). In 2012 he was appointed Head of Special Branch for the East Midlands Specialist Operations Unit, which position he held in 2014.[56]Police and Constabulary Almanac, Sweet & Maxwell, various years.

G Newton
Author of review of Kennedy’s ongoing role infiltrating environmental protestors in April 2009.

The 7 April 2009 Nottinghamshire Special Branch review of Kennedy’s role in Operation Pegasus as part of an application made by DI Andy Bateman was authored by a G. Newton, who is named as ‘CS Manager’ without a rank in the document. This is presumably the same Det. Insp. G. Newton who from 1999 to 2005 had been Head of Crime Intelligence for the force, Crime Intelligence being a sister unit to Special Branch under the Directorate of Intelligence.[57]Police and Constabulary Almanac, various years, R Hazell & Co, various years. Given the force’s history of hiring retired officers as civilian workers, it is likely he was working for the local Special Branch at the time he authored the application. It is thought that ‘CS’ in the description of his role stands for ‘Confidential Source’.

Detective Constable Nigel Malik
Intelligence Officer for Aeroscope with responsibility for security of its material. In place 22 April to 12 October 2009.

First appears as with the ‘West Bridgford intelligence unit’ when he was involved in the recovery of a bike for local MP Alan Simpson.[58]MP’s stolen bike is back, Nottingham Evening Post, 5 August 1999 (accessed via Nexis). In 2003/2005 he was part of Operation Stealth (headed by then DCI Ian Waterfield), which targeted drugs and guns in Nottingham, and for which he is quoted in a number of articles at the time (given rank of Detective Constable and Detective Sergeant).[59]Pastor’s firearm appeal, Nottingham Evening Post, 11 August 2003 (accessed via Nexis).[60]More arrests in drug crackdown, BBC News Online, 22 July 2004 (accessed 20 August 2016).[61]Major blitz on drugs, Nottingham Evening Post, 21 July 2004 (accessed via Nexis).[62]Father jailed for Bond gun, Nottingham Evening Post, 13 July 2005 (accessed via Nexis). By September 2012, PC 774 Nigel Malik is part of the Hucknall Safer Neighbourhood Teams[63]Nick Butler, Safer neighbourhoods, NG15 (local community advertising newsletter), page 24, September/October 2012 (accessed via Issuu.com 20 August 2016). and was still there in May 2016.[64]Safer neighbourhoods, NG15 (local community advertising newsletter), page 22, May/June 2016 (accessed 20 August 2016).

Manjeet Matharu, ‘Civilian Investigator’
Seconded onto Operation Aeroscope as the Disclosure Officer on 23 April 2009. According to the IPCC report: ‘[Matharu] stated that at this time he was not informed of the operational planning which led to the arrests, and was not informed that the information had been provided by a [undercover officer]. Mr Matharu stated he was aware his role as Disclosure Officer was to ‘ensure all material obtained in the course of this investigation was revealed to the Crown Prosecution Service by means of disclosure schedules…’ Having become aware of the presence of an undercover in the operation in October / November 2009, Matharu then had various discussions with senior officers and Ian Cunningham of the CPS about disclosure of material relating to the undercover. He also took over some of the role of Nigel Malik when the latter left the operation.

In 2006, DC Manjeet Matharu had been the police liaison officer for the family of murdered taxi driver Ethsham Ul-Haq Ghafoor, having been part of the original murder investigation team 12 years previously.[65]Guy Woodford, Why? Asks family of murdered taxi driver, Nottingham Evening Post, 1 April 2006 (accessed via Nexis). Retired circa 2009.[66]New Members, Notts NARPO News – newsletter of National Association of Retired Police Officers (Nottinghamshire Branch), Issue 107, Spring 2009 (accessed 20 August 2016).

Detective Constable Mark Zajac
Joined Aeroscope as ‘File Officer’ on 12 May, and learned of an undercover’s role in Aeroscope in a meeting between police and CPS on 6 June, and later a meeting of 13 October 2010 between police, CPS and Felicity Gerry (prosecution barrister) in which the presence of an undercover was again discussed. On 5 January 2011 he brought prosecution barrister Felicity Gerry a box of disclosure material relating to Mark Kennedy, when the ‘deniers’ said they were going to call the ex-undercover as a witness.

Appears in 2004 as serving with Oxclose Lane CID.[67]Man stabbed in bus-stop attack, Nottingham Evening Post, 23 January 2004 (accessed via Nexis).

Supt. Mike Manley, Nottinghamshire Police

Supt. Mike Manley
In 2008-2009 Manley was Head of Operations for South Notts Division, under Busuttil.[68]Police and Constabulary Almanac, various years, R Hazell & Co, various years. He was involved in arrest phase of Operation Aeroscope, and was cited the next day as saying the operation was intelligence-led and discussing the large amount of material seized as evidence:[69] Delia Monk, Protest arrests were justified say police, Nottingham Evening Post, 15 April 2009 (accessed via Nexis).[70] Police defend power station raid, BBC News Online, 14 April 2009 (accessed 21 July 2017).

Our information was that it wasn’t to be a lawful protest. This was to be a criminal act against a power station. Had that taken place, we would have now been policing a major protest at a major power station.

 

Previously he had been Detective Chief Inspector for Crime Management in D Division 2005-2006. In 2009/2010 he moves to head up Corporate Development & Communications for the force before coming Superintendent for Operations North (Nottingham City) in 2011), then Head of Crime for the reorgansied County Division in 2012-2014.[71]Police and Constabulary Almanac, various years, R Hazell & Co, various years. In September 2015 he became Chief Superintendent, head of Nottingham City division.[72]Top cop’s knife warning, Hucknall Despatch, 8 September 2015. remaining there into 2016.

Superintendent Paul Anderson
Attended the Gold level meeting of 7 April 2009.[73]Response of Nottinghamshire Police to FOIA request made by Merrick Badger, 24 July 2018. At the time, Anderson was the Deputy Divisional Commander for D Division (Head of Operations), having taken up that post in early 2009.[74]Criticism at police charge, Newark Advertiser, 27 March 2009. He later spoke out in press defending police action saying:[75] Activists plotted to ‘starve’ Ratcliffe power station, BBC News Online, 10 October 2011.

[The arrests had] minimised any risk of injury or harm to the protesters… and stopped any damage being caused and any of the staff at the power station or my officers being injured.

 

In 2008 he had been head of ‘Operations North’ in Nottingham city, the area were Kennedy lived. He remains in D Division in 2010-2011.Over the next few years he carries out a variety of roles for Nottinghamshire Police and in 2014 he is Head of Operations for County Division.[76]Police and Constabulary Almanac, various years, R Hazell & co.[77] Author: search of local newspaper articles, conducted August 2018.

Chief Inspector Ian Barrowcliffe
Attended the Gold level meeting of 7 April 2009. Not otherwise mentioned, but probably played a role in the organisation of police resources and deployments relating to the arrests of 13 April.

Barrowcliffe as Chief Inspector was Head of Demand Management in 2004-2006 and in 2008-2014 (later as Temporary Superintendent) of Operations and Planning.[78]Police and Constabulary Almanac, various years, R Hazell & Co, various years. In 2017 he was Head of Policy and Compliance for the East Midlands Operational Support Services.[79]Minutes of Joint Audit Risk Assurance Committee, Derbyshire Police and Crime Commissioner, 15 May 2017.

ACC Susannah Fish, Nottinghamshire Police

Assistant Chief Constable Susannah Fish
As ACC (Crime) and overseeing the intelligence units, including Special Branch, she is likely to have been aware of Kennedy’s role in the city as an NPOIU undercover and been aware of the run up to Operation Aeroscope, albeit she left the force two months after the arrests of 13 April.

Appointed Assistant Chief Constable (HQ Operations, later Crime) in 2003, she oversaw both the Crime and Intelligence Directorates until 2009.[80]Assistant Chief Constable Crime, Nottinghamshire Police (website), 2007 (accessed via Archive.org). In June 2009 she was seconded to the Home Office and to the Metropolitan Police. She returned to Nottinghamshire Police as Assistant Chief Constable in June 2012 and was subsequently appointed Deputy Chief Constable (April 2013) and Temporary Chief Constable (2016-2017). She retired in April 2017.[81]Susannah Fish, Profile, LinkedIn.com, 2017 (accessed 14 June 2017).[82]Our Team: Susannah Fish, Nottinghamshire Police (website), 2016 (accessed via Archive.org).

NPOIU & National Domestic Extremism Unit

Assistant Chief Constable Anton Setchell, National Domestic Extremism Co-ordinator

Assistant Chief Constable Anton Setchell
Likely to be the ‘ACPO Gold’ for whom one of the Kennedy intelligence reports on Ratcliffe was marked for the attention of.

A Thames Valley Police officer, since 2004 he had been seconded to ACPO’s Terrorism and Allied Matters Committee as the National Co-ordinator for Domestic Extremism. In 2006 he acquired oversight of the National Public Order Intelligence Unit.

Detective Chief Inspector Nightingale
Presumed to be the ‘NPOIU DCI’ referred to through-out the Rose and IPCC reports, and who was criticised by Rose (para. 51) for withholding information from Nottinghamshire Police and the Crown Prosecution Service. He had retired by the time the IPCC report was published in March 2012.

Detective Inspector David Hutcheson
Appears on the distribution list for Kennedy related NPOIU intelligence reports on various occasions. He is likely to be the ‘NPOIU DI’ referred to on a number of occasions in the Rose’s report.

In a Metropolitan Police document, he is noted as being the controller for Kennedy,[83]’Jaipur’ & ‘Karachi’, The ‘Mosaic Effect’ and the potential risk to officers (redacted), Metropolitan Police Service (Assistant Commissioner’s Public Inquiry Team), 1 Dec 2015, p. 32, accessed via ucpi.org.uk. and is thought to had responsibility for Kennedy for the latter part of his deployment. Currently believed to be serving with Metropolitan Police.[84]Public masturbators and flashers strike more than once a month in Islington, Islington Gazette, 25 February 2014.

Andy Robbins, National Domestic Extremism Team

Detective Chief Inspector Andy Robbins
His name is included in the distribution list for one of the NPOIU intelligence reports relating to the Ratcliffe-on-Soar protests, indicating that the National Domestic Extremism Team had an interest in Aeroscope.

A detective with Kent police he was seconded to NDEU (probably in 2008[85]Arrest is made after swoop on local farm, Kent and Sussex Courier, 11 July 2008 (accessed via Nexis). ), where, as a Det. Ch. Insp., he was the Senior Investigating Officer for two years of Operation Achilles, targeting animal rights campaigners.[86]For extremists who blackmailed animal lab, it was all about the cause, The Guardian, 23 December 2008 (accessed via Nexis).[87]Sandra Laville, Animal rights extremists still targeting lab, The Guardian, 24 December 2008 (accessed via Nexis). From February 2009 to January 2013 he was head of the National Domestic Extremism Team,[88]Andrew Robbins, Profile, LinkedIn.com, 2016 (accessed 10 August 2016). where he continued to oversee ongoing operations and prosecutions of animal rights activists. As head of the NDEU would have been very aware of the activities of NPOIU undercover operations at the time, particularly that of Mark Kennedy.[89]Undercover Research Group, Andrew Robbins, Powerbase.info, 2016.

Distribution list for the NPOIU / Kennedy intelligence report of 23 March 2009, naming Det. Ch. Insp. Nightingale, Det. Insp. Hutcheson, Det. Ch. Insp. Andy Robbins and Det. Insp. Hedley.

Detective Inspector Hedley (National Domestic Extremism Team)
Name given on the distribution list for some of Kennedy related NPOIU intelligence reports.

Lawyers

Nick Paul, QC, National Domestic Extremism Co-ordinator for the Crown Prosecution Service

Nick Paul, QC
National Co-ordinator for Domestic Extremism as a Senior Crown Advocate within the Crown Prosecution Service’s Special Crime Division until January 2010. He had knowledge of Operation Aeroscope, in its pre-arrest phase, and approved the appointment of Cunningham as the lead for the prosecution. He also intially opposed the dropping of charges against Kennedy, for his role in the planned protests.[90]Sir Christopher Rose, Radcliffe-on-Soar Power Station Protest: Inquiry into Disclosure, Crown Prosecution Service, December 2011.[91]Ratcliffe-on-Soar Power Station (Operation Aeroscope) Disclosure: Final Report, Independent Police Complaints Commission, March 2012.

As CPS Domestic Extremism Co-ordinator, he also oversaw the 2008 prosecution of the Drax train climate protestors which also involved Mark Kennedy.[92]Prosecutors and Police Engineering Miscarriages of Justice, Campaign Opposing Police Surveillance, 6 October 2014 (accessed 21 July 2017). In this role he would have worked closely with the National Domestic Extremism Unit, including the NPOIU (then a sub-unit within NDEC). At one point he is described as:[93]Doughty Street welcomes back founding member Nick Paul, Doughty Street Chambers, 22 November 2011 (accessed 21 July 2017).

He was also responsible for advising the Police in respect of covert investigations in respect of domestic extremism cases and developed a close working knowledge of RIPA.

 

In November 2011 he re-joined Doughty Street Chambers, which he had helped found in 1990.[94]Doughty Street welcomes back founding member Nick Paul, Doughty Street Chambers, 22 November 2011 (accessed 21 July 2017). After stepping down as Director of Public Prosecutions in 2013, Keir Starmer also re-joined Doughty Street Chambers.[95]Sir Keir Starmer, KCB, QC, Doughty Street Chambers, 2017 (accessed 21 July 2017).

Bethan David
Took over as National Co-ordinator for Domestic Extremism within the CPS in January 2010, and as such had responsibility for overseeing the prosecutions.

She also had knowledge of Kennedy’s role in other court cases.[96]Sir Christopher Rose, Radcliffe-on-Soar Power Station Protest: Inquiry into Disclosure, Crown Prosecution Service, December 2011. With the CPS since 2005, she became Head of Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division there.[97]Bethan David,  Profile, LinkedIn.com, 2017 (accessed 21 July 2017).

Ian Cunningham
A crown advocate in the Nottingham office of the CPS’s East Midlands Complex Case Unit. Appointed by Nick Paul to act as the lead prosecutor in the case, he had a number of meetings with police and was aware of Kennedy’s role as a police informer, though there is disagreement over the extent to which he was aware of Kennedy’s particular role.

Subsequently heavily criticised in the Rose report.[98]Sir Christopher Rose, Radcliffe-on-Soar Power Station Protest: Inquiry into Disclosure, Crown Prosecution Service, December 2011.[99]Ratcliffe-on-Soar Power Station (Operation Aeroscope) Disclosure: Final Report, Independent Police Complaints Commission, March 2012. Rose noted that he was described in minutes of a police Gold meeting on 16 April as ‘danger environmentally friendly. Local CPS reticent’, though no evidence of this was adduced to in any of the reports and Rose noted there was no reason presented to him as to why this perception arose, or its basis.[100]Sir Christopher Rose, Radcliffe-on-Soar Power Station Protest: Inquiry into Disclosure, Crown Prosecution Service, December 2011.

Lesley Renfrew
Head of the CPS’s East Midlands Complex Case Unit so Cunningham’s immediate boss. Interviewed by Christopher Rose.[101]Sir Christopher Rose, Radcliffe-on-Soar Power Station Protest: Inquiry into Disclosure, Crown Prosecution Service, December 2011.

Felicity Gerry, QC
Prosecuting counsel for the two Ratcliffe-on-Soar trials. When made aware of the full extent of the Kennedy material it was she who recommended the ‘deniers’ case be discontinued.[102]Ratcliffe-on-Soar Power Station (Operation Aeroscope) Disclosure: Final Report, Independent Police Complaints Commission, March 2012.

Had previously been involved in prosecuting other high profile cases which had been investigated by the National Domestic Extremism Unit and used undercover / informers to provide intelligence leading to raids and arrests. At the time was with 36 Bedford Chambers, but has since moved to Carmelite Chambers.[103]New Tenant – We are delighted to welcome Felicity Gerry QC (formerly of 36 Bedford Row) to Carmelite Chambers, Carmelite Chambers, 15 June 2016 (accessed 21 July 2017).

David Herbert, QC
Prosecuting counsel for Aeroscope until September 2010, when he was instructed to another case and handed the brief to Felicity Gerry. Interviewed by Christopher Rose whom he told he was given the impression that Kennedy was ‘on the periphery of what was happening’.[104]Sir Christopher Rose, Radcliffe-on-Soar Power Station Protest: Inquiry into Disclosure, Crown Prosecution Service, December 2011.

A criminal law specialist at 36 Bedford Chambers where his profile states:[105]David Herbert QC, 36 Group, 2017 (accessed 21 July 2017).

David is considered an expert in cases involving covert law enforcement and is adept at dealing with the sensitive issues that arise in such matters.

 

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References   [ + ]

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